Posts Tagged ‘ innovation ’

 
Thursday, September 6th, 2012

by Warren Brown

Welcome to my first post on blogOV.

Since taking over as President in July, there has been strong interest from many customers, partners and connections for more information about all aspects of OV’s business. I’ve never been accused of being at a loss for words, so I thought we’d reinvigorate blogOV as part of an expanded reach-out to everyone in the market. Over the coming weeks and months, stay tuned to this space for a variety of updates – from the innovative work we are doing with cutting-edge analytics for a number of government agencies to the latest updates to our software and recent news from our patent licensing program. It is a very exciting time here at OV and I have the privilege of working with a very talented, motivated team.

To start off the conversation, I want to share some more information about our patent licensing program. My hope is that this post and the additional content I reference will help to clarify any misunderstandings that may exist and make it clearer what the program is all about. OV has been working on creating great video analytics for more than 10 years. As a result, our team of PhDs and computer vision scientists has come up with a number of key innovations to help improve the accuracy and efficiency of video analytics; we have patented many of these technologies. We are now working with most of the major analytics manufacturers in the security industry to license these technologies, ensuring that OV is compensated for their use of our intellectual property and, for patent licensees, give them the ability to build new and innovative products that take advantage of those patented – and licensed – technologies.

We have five existing licensees and expect to announce several more soon. To help explain the program and address many of the questions I have received, we have put together an FAQ (download a copy HERE) that gives a more detailed status update.

In summary, our patent licensing program is adding new licensees all the time and we’ve recently added a new set of benefits for our licensees to further help them build their business. We expect this momentum to continue. (learn more HERE)

Please have a read of the FAQ doc and let us know if it answers your questions. If not, feel free to comment below, give us a call or drop us a line and we will continue the dialogue.

Cheers,

Warren

 

 
Friday, April 15th, 2011

by Raul Fernandez

Since January 1st, OV has experienced a number of exciting changes. We closed our recapitalization transaction with a new financial partner, York Capital Management, and have since added an IP licensing program to our business. The company has a strong balance sheet, no debt, and had a great Q1. Furthermore, OV has demonstrated its continued commitment to innovation by recently announcing our support for the ARM processor.

We have also attracted some great, new talent to join the outstanding team that we already have in place. Bill Marino, OV’s Chief Intellectual Property Officer, and Anthony Grillo, Senior Vice President of Litigation and Licensing, join our team after a successful IP licensing stint at Saxon Innovations. Both individuals have over 15 years of experience in the realm of IP management, assertion, and protection.

After nearly three years at GE and later UTC, Alan Lipton will be returning to OV as the CTO of our IP licensing group. Khanh Lam, General Manager of Asia, comes to OV from Intersil (formerly Techwell) with 18 years of experience in the high tech industry. And finally, Albert Au, Manager of Application Engineering with a focus on supporting our Asian OEM’s, joins our team from Aptina Imaging and has 10 years of experience offering technical support to video solutions providers.

I am excited to step back into the role of CEO, and I look forward to updating all of you on OV’s progress moving forward.

Regards,

Raul

 
Monday, March 8th, 2010

by Paul Brewer

If you ask security directors how they go back into the video archives to search for something abnormal or for a specific event, the answer is almost always, “I don’t.”  Unless they know which camera feed to watch, and have a fairly good idea of the when to start searching in the video, this manual task is just too daunting. 

Video analytics has brought some much needed automation to this problem.  Now if you know where the event of interest occurred and can create a tripwire or other event rule, then all you have to do is to scroll through the alert logs and jump to that point in the video feed.

That’s great as far as it goes, but it’s still pretty limited.

What do users really want?  Based on direct user feedback, they want to be able to search for specific people, vehicles or events across the enterprise video system.  They want to use what they learn from one search to refine the next.  They want to search by example—designating a specific vehicle or person of interest to flag in a database search that might be narrowed by a specific geographic region or time period.  They want to create searches and visualize search results on an intuitive geo-interface.  And, they don’t want to just be limited to the video archives.  Forensic search results need to then become the parameters for real-time rules to find exactly where that white cargo van of interest is right now. 

This is the future of video search and it is what we are demonstrating right now for our sponsors in the Department of Defense.  A recent field exercise allowed ObjectVideo to showcase the ability to visually “fingerprint” cars that were flagged by HUMINT (human intelligence) and pick them out of the video feeds to present ultra high resolution snapshots to the “Battle Captain.” 

This was not a carefully controlled lab experiment with rigidly scripted scenarios with a small set of total vehicles.  This was a real needle-in-the-haystack exercise with a very small number of “opposition” vehicles operating on crowded public streets.  These vehicles were controlled by an opposition commander with purposes known only to him.

Besides being a great chance to show off what we can currently do with this technology, it was a priceless opportunity to learn from users and hone some new interface and workflow ideas.  When it comes to video search, the best days are still ahead, and possibly not as far off as you might think.