Archive for the ‘ product discussion ’ Category

 
Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

by David McGuinness, Gary Myers and Edward Troha

Optimism. It was encouraging to hear manufacturers, integrators, a few end-users/customers and even industry analysts talking about positive plans and expectations for the year.  The adoption rate for IP solutions is gaining speed.  Although 2009 was a year of recession, IP video still grew in the 20-25% range and the promotion of IP was clearly the headline from big traditional players such as Pelco and Tyco.  Major manufacturers spoke about more new IP and analytics-enabled products in the 2010 pipeline.  Good for our industry.

Walking around, it is always interesting to see what companies are doing to draw people into their booths. Outside of the obvious, there was a car giveaway, a “game-show” which faced off attendees to see who could install an alarm panel first, former NFL players signing autographs, a Kindle giveaway, and quite a few soon-to-be-released iPad giveaways. Overall, the traffic at the show seemed to be pretty good and these approaches did draw in the people for at least a look-see. It was easy to get sucked into the booth run by a local company (non-industry) that was doing golf club fitting. They had a golf net and launch monitor with lots of clubs to try out… a certain OV golf nut came very close to going home with a new driver!

Even though there were fewer exhibitors this year, ISC West was as busy as ever.  Thinking Friday would be quiet all day, it turned out traffic didn’t thin until about 12:30.  Keeping with the ”intelligent ingredient” theme, ObjectVideo demos of several varieties were hosted by a number of solution partners, including Pelco, Genetec and DIGIOP.  In addition, it’s encouraging to see the growing opportunities the combination of ObjectVideo and Intel technologies brings to the security and business intelligence markets.  Analytics is not the solution, it just helps to bring much greater value to the solution.

 
Monday, September 28th, 2009
by Paul Brewer

We’ve all gotten spoiled by our HDTVs at home.  I for one will never go back to NTSC.  Is the security industry heading down that same path?  You would certainly think so if you walked the show floor at ASIS this week where there was more HD than at your local Best Buy.  But the question that kept nagging at me:  Is the rest of the industry ready for HD?  Will a 1080p, or a 5 MPixel IP camera swamp the network, flood the DVR and generally be just too much for the current state of the video ecosystem?

This recent Pelco/Cisco announcement shows that there is hope. Pelco and Cisco have teamed to jointly develop new HD IP cameras based on Pelco’s Sarix platform.  This is a great team that will be able to support HiDef from the lens to the user.

What does all of this mean for the world of video analytics?  ObjectVideo has been working with HD for years—mostly on military and other federal projects.  The benefits of HD are clear.  More pixels means greater range, wider fields of view and more pixels on target.  In addition, the benefits of deploying analytics at the edge to reduce network load are compelling.

The industry is opening its eyes to HD, which will only make the value of analytics even greater.

 
Saturday, September 26th, 2009
by Bob Cutting

I doubt if the best way to track video analytic progress and adoption is by listening to what the analytic vendors are saying and doing.  That’s why I like to visit video management and PSIM booths at shows to see what they are doing with analytics.  I find they have a unique perspective as customers often turn to them to bring video management, storage, analytics and other data together.  So rather than looking just at “what analytics can do,” it’s interesting to see how users want to leverage analytics as part of an overall video system.  And that’s consistent with what OV has been professing for a long time—analytics IS a vital ingredient to video surveillance applications, but not an application in itself. 

At ASIS 2009, after looking around the booths of companies like Milestone, Genetec, ONSSI, VidSys, Synectics, Cisco, Instek, and a few others (some OV partners, others not), and talking with the people there, it’s pleasing to see a much more advanced take on analytics.  More of these companies are making analytics a strategic part of their offering.  What Synectics is doing with their Dataveillance program is spot on.  As well, I saw applications that I have not tracked in the past (e.g., SoleraTec) leveraging analytic data to solve things such as intelligent video storage, search and retention. This is great for the end user as it enhances the usability of analytics and delivers the necessary video + analytic integration—two obstacles that have hindered analytics adoption in the past. 

Unfortunately, I still saw the side-by-side demos; those vendors who just want to “plug in” analytics may find themselves late to the game.  And why would you have a separate analytic search tool from an analytics vendor in addition to your video management platform? Leading VMS’s are building those analytic capabilities into a unified video system, and it’s clear that that is what system integrators and end users want to buy.  Standardization efforts will help in coming months, but it will take more vision and “listen to the customer” activity from analytics vendors to not just deliver functionality, but deliver it in a more usable and scalable way.